CCS C Software and Maintenance Offers
FAQFAQ   FAQForum Help   FAQOfficial CCS Support   SearchSearch  RegisterRegister 

ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

CCS does not monitor this forum on a regular basis.

Please do not post bug Reports on this forum. Send them to support@ccsinfo.com

Power supply

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    CCS Forum Index -> General CCS C Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
aaronik19



Joined: 25 Apr 2011
Posts: 296

View user's profile Send private message

Power supply
PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2022 3:51 am     Reply with quote

Dear all, sorry that i am posting here with this question maybe it is not directly related to CCS but i am going to use this circuit with PIC micro. I would like to design a power supply which has an input range of 12v-230v ac/dc. Do some have an experience and maybe some information about this? I know that here we have many people with lot of knowledge.

Typical application is use in DIN Rail multi-function timers we use in our consumer units and industry.

Thanks alot
Ttelmah



Joined: 11 Mar 2010
Posts: 18123

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2022 4:22 am     Reply with quote

Seriously, going that wide, will make it expensive and inefficient.
Much better to build your circuit to actually run directly from DC at
(say) 8 to 30v, and have a separate down converter supporting perhaps
80 to 250v AC, generating 24v DC. Have this feed the DC connection
through diodes, and you have available DC input pins or AC input
pins.
Super wide circuits do exist, but usually only at very low power. Even
articles talking about 'super wide input ranges', tend to peter out at
perhaps 10:1 to 15:1 input ranges.
The range you give, is wider than any I have heard of (the widest I
know of is 18:1, from Cincon, which they advertise as the 'widest in
the world')....
I have seen a few 'smart' circuits that push wide ranges but these
normally are done by having a separate control circuit that switches
between different internal supplies. So you have the control disconnect
the internal supplies at boot, and then sense what is on the connection,
and connect this to either the high voltage AC supply or the lower
voltage DC circuit. Straight away, at least double the cost....
temtronic



Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 8528
Location: Greensville,Ontario

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2022 10:09 am     Reply with quote

As Mr T points out, that's a HUGE range to deal with AND there's the AC/DC aspect to consider...
Not mentioned is the CURRENT requirement. It's possibly doable at sub 1 amp levels but gets real 'challenging' if you need 5-50 amps.

It'd be dead simple if YOU specified that the CLIENT had to supply the input power of YOUR choice. In every industrial install I've done, they could supply 120 or 240, single or 3 phase power to the machine.
aaronik19



Joined: 25 Apr 2011
Posts: 296

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2022 5:50 pm     Reply with quote

Dear all thanks for your reply. For example power supply used in these kind of DIN Rail timers, i think that output voltage is around 5 to 7v and current is around 100mA. I think it will be a good idea if some can share some knowledge about this Smile it is very interesting.

[img]https://ibb.co/bbfPXxj[/img]
temtronic



Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 8528
Location: Greensville,Ontario

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2022 6:25 pm     Reply with quote

The power spec of that timer says it can connect to a power supply anywhere between 12 to 230 volts, AC or DC ..it doesn't mean the actual power supply is variable between 12 and 230 volts !
It really means that any voltage greater than 12 volts, either AC or DC can power the timer. I can run of a car battery, European 'mains' (230) or Canadian 120 power.
I read your original post as you want a single power supply that can provide any voltage between 12 and 230 volts, as AC or DC, and as Mr. T points out this is a very, very wide range for it to run at.

If the requirement is to test these timers, then a test jig with 5 fixed power supplies would work. Say 12 VAC, 12 DC, 120VAC, 230 VAC, 100VDC. A simple DPST switch could be used to control the power to the 'timer under test'.

Since I'm kinda confused( yes, I'm a dinosaur) , perhaps you can better explain what you really need to accomplish.
Ttelmah



Joined: 11 Mar 2010
Posts: 18123

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2022 1:02 am     Reply with quote

The supply in these can only deliver about 0.66W. Their efficiency is appalling.
To supply this, they draw over 3W, when run off the mains. Do a search for
PMP20182, which is the Texas reference design for the supply in these. The
supply is not isolated in this type of unit. They rely on the solid state relays
used to provide the switching outputs, to give the isolation. So a triple
'beware' if you are trying to build units using a supply like this. The output
is 12v 55mA in the reference design, but the output voltage can be changed.
aaronik19



Joined: 25 Apr 2011
Posts: 296

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2022 4:23 am     Reply with quote

Yes in fact i want to refer that you can apply from 12v to 240v ac or dc and the circuit operate without any problems. As others said the circuit give a very low current output and efficiency is compromised.
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    CCS Forum Index -> General CCS C Discussion All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group